The Art of War by Sun Tzu is one of the most celebrated texts on military philosophy and strategy. Its influence is worldwide, even encompassing the interest of business executives and celebrities in America and other parts of the world.

Esoteric Commentaries on the Art of War is a series of discussions that illustrates this legendary Chinese military treatise‘s spiritual application and value in conjunction with the Art of Ninzuwu. We will be using the English translation of the Art of War by Lionel Giles, first published in 1910 for this series.

Chapter 1: Laying Plans

  1. Sun Tzu said: The art of war is of vital importance to State.

Warlock Asylum: The art of war is the art of survival on the emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual plains of life.  War is the outer manifestation of an internal process occurring within man.  Therefore, the words of Sun Tzu, master military commander, apply not only to a militia, but to human society as a whole. We must all learn the art of war (survival) in the womb of life on this physical plain and beyond.

The “State” refers to our seat of gravity, or the emotional state that creates our experience. Our freedom lies in gaining awareness of how we are creators of own experience, whether we are conscious of these things or not. Therefore, the prosperity of our lives depends upon understanding and achieving a knowledge of self.

  1. It is a matter of life and death, a road either to safety or to ruin. Hence it is a subject of inquiry which can on no account be neglected.

Warlock Asylum: When the ways of Heaven are not followed, our earthly lives become difficult to manage. Although the subject of war, in the eyes of the layman, would appear as the result of chance, it can be calculated and is the physical manifestation of the interaction of hidden laws found in nature.

Nature moves in cycles and each variation in these consistent patterns is regarded as an element. In other words, nature expresses itself through the element that we use to speak with it.  It is by means of such a study that we can understand nature and how the phenomenal world communicates with us.  For example, the way of the shaman can be said to be a way of fire, as fire is used as a tool in many shamanic ceremonies.

You will find that many shamans have been exposed to a see-saw of joys and tragedies; death by otherworldly influences, expressions of deep-seated passions and dramatic changes in life, as fire burns wood to create earth (ash). The shaman’s use of fire burns a certain intangible principles which materialize as ashes (experiences) in the phenomenal world. When we study nature, we learn how life principles move in cycles and how they interact with each other through life’s principles manifesting in life itself, which means that these things are also working within us.  Let’s explain a bit further.

The novice, who is unaware of the sciences of invisible phenomena, embody certain forces that may be indifferent to one’s environment. These forces are not “evil” in themselves. Just like a snowstorm isn’t evil. However, if we find ourselves lacking in self-observation, we could be harboring an element indifferent to the outer world and thereby receive a negative fate. One example of this can be seen by people who hold onto truth instead of letting it live in being.

Truth must orbit its source in order to purify itself. It travels in time in order to breathe and maintain its vitality. When people take a reflection of truth and make it an issue of debate, they are working against the natural process of truth’s light.  It’s like the stars in heaven. Once a star can no longer be seen above earth’s horizon, its truth will become a lie within the mind of reason. This form of black magic is often used in religion, whereby people feel they have a right to insult others and disrespect natural law because they have the truth. They will use their newfound truth to insult others. In their campaign to spread “the truth,” they will procure evil emotions in others, due to their lack of respect for anyone’s belief system except their own. This is one example in how negative energies enter the world by maintaining truth out of season.

We find this also occurs in some areas of socialization. Oppressed people are often informed by their pseudo-leadership that will incite minorities into a condition of anger over the revelation of certain truths. In turn, these angry people will return to their communities and attract emotions equal to their own disposition.

There is no truth, but the process itself. It is an eternal process that is the foundation of all teaching thereof. It is not a doctrine found in a sacred text, but must be studied by studying ourselves. It is through these five elements that the World of Nine travels through in efforts to reach its own maturity. Thus, we have 9 x 5 = 45.

The number 45 is sacred in Ninzuwu practice. There are 45 days in each sign of the Nyarzirian Calendar, which is used by the Ninzuwu. 45 is the sum of the numbers one through nine.

1 + 2 + 3 = 6

4 + 5 + 6 = 15

7 + 8 + 9 = 24

6 + 15 + 24 = 45

45 is also the sum of the Vasuh letter Bnhu, or B(2) + N(14) + H(8) + U(21) = 45. Bnhu is ruled by Owatatsumi-no-Mikoto. Thus, we find that the number 45 represents spirit, the otherworldly realms, often described in mythology as existing beneath the seas. It is a yin force and is representative of the energy of the goddess as it is described in the Ivory Tablets:

“the Soul of Fire, known to the ancient by the names of many goddesses, and it takes up residence in the flesh.”

Later, the Ivory Tablets states:

“Know that all things exist in water, and that water is the space that the Dream exists in. Fire is the power that radiates its influence over the Dream, and the ancients would create “gods” out of those that shine the brightest.”

The Dream is spirit. It is the Void. It is made of odd numbers. All things are born out of the Dream, the Great Mother. The Soul of Fire, or Fire Angel, known by the names of many goddesses, which ‘takes up residence in the flesh,’ are the gate-keepers between the Void and the phenomenal world.

The phenomenal world is the composed of the power of nine multiplied by the four alchemical principles creating the Dharma (Stone Bowl of Eternity), or the even number 36. The number 36 represents the prerequisite and structural knowledge that is needed before initiation into the Void. Even numbers represent law 36 + 45 = 81, or the Tao Te Ching, a term that means the Way of Virtue. The Book of 81, The Tao Te Ching, is text that measures the relationship between order and chaos, odd and even numbers, and yin and yang. The “way’ that can be named is not the Way because names represent destinies, beginning and endings.

The gatekeepers are the guardians of the crossroads, the fire-angels, the race of Zu, also known as the Jinn and Tengu. Their proper name is Ninzuwu, a term equaling 128, meaning, Magicians of the Yi Jing, the science of what in Japan is called Onmyodo. When we subtract 45 from 128, we get 83. Both the Ayaqox and the Iwuvh equal the some of 83.

The Soul of Fire is a force known by the names of many goddesses. It also represents a process. When an individual dedicates themselves to a deity, they merge subconsciously with the said entity. The entity is thereby able to interact and interfere with the experiences of its hosts. After the person hosting such energies pass form, their emotional, mental, and spiritual constitutions is absorbed by the entity and their consciousness is no longer that of an individual, but of a collective consciousness that is often superstitiously deified by man. In many cases, these deities are symbolic of stars or the dead.

The Ninzuwu, in a manner similar to Sarutahiko-Okami, forefather of the race of tengu and a manifestation of Susanoo-no-Mikoto, are the guardian of the eight crossroads. They exist in the cosmic waters with no allegiance to deity or the dead. The Ninzuwu are described in the Ivory Tablets of the Crow, as “the caretakers of the stars.” This means that they are the working technicians of the universe. The Art of War, though having a practical application, is a spiritual treaty about the operations of the cosmos.

Advertisements

Join the conversation! 1 Comment

  1. amazing work!! one of my favorite and first text i studied when i was young that brother! I will actually write this down and look forward to more!!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Category

Anzu-bird, Art of War by Sun Tzu, Black Dragon Society, Bnhu, Calendar of Mu, Chapter 1: Laying Plans, Chinese Military Treatise, dreams, Esoteric Commentaries on the Art of War by Sun Tzu, Ivory Tablets of the Crow, Necronomicon Tradition, Ninzuwu, Nyarzirian Calendar, Religion, Sarutahiko-no-Ohkami, shaman, shamanism, Shinto, Sun Tzu, Susanoo-no-Mikoto, Taoism, Tengu, The Ivory Tablets of the Crow, Warlock Asylum, Watatsumi, Yi Jing, Yi Jing Sorcery