Greetings! Welcome to the Art of Ninzuwu blog page. If this is your first time visiting us, feel free to use this opportunity as a time to review some of our previous articles. We look forward to hearing some of your insights as well, so please do not hesitate to post a comment. Have a blessed day!

The inspiration one can receive from a martial artist is like nothing else in this world. One of the greatest strengths experienced by those in the arts, is their humility and their love for the divine that is expressed in simplicity.

Our guest, Noah Chace, is a very beautiful person. I am sure that those who know him personally can attest to the inspiration they receive from his clarity and innocence. Fortunately, we had a chance to connect on Facebook. I am sure that you will enjoy the discussion.

Warlock Asylum gets a chance to talk with the legendary Noah Chace about the art of Ninpo Taijutsu

Warlock Asylum gets a chance to talk with the legendary Noah Chace.

Warlock Asylum: I am so happy that we finally get a chance to hear some of your insights and wisdom.  However, for some of our readers who may not be familiar with your persona, how would you best describe yourself?

Noah Chace: I am a student of life. A musician whose main interest is guitar. I like spending time with nature and hiking in the woods.

Warlock Asylum: How did your interest in music begin? What attracted you to the guitar?

Noah Chace: In 8th grade, my father wanted me to take up a new hobby, other than skateboarding. I had a couple of injuries. He asked me; ‘if would you ever consider playing guitar?’ Before then, skating was my passion and there was nothing that could make me stop. But, when my father asked me to play guitar, I felt right.  It was something that I would like to try. Soon after, I took up guitar and started playing in bands. Eventually, I got to travel and see the country.

Warlock Asylum: You are a man of many talents, one being photography. What inspired you to pursue the art of photography?

Noah Chace: I was always impressed by people who could create art; visual art, painting, drawing, or even acting. A really good photo is art that catches a moment of life that can be experienced by the viewer.

Warlock Asylum: What spiritual value do you find in your work as a photographer? I am sure that in frequently composing camera shots, you might catch a glimpse of the hidden language in life. Would you care to expand?

Noah Chace: Yes, I agree. Photographs capture a moment in time that is gone. Life in that moment can be felt through a photo, whether it is happiness or sadness. Photographs help us to remember the past, in this moment. It’s a reflection of life.

Warlock Asylum: What are some of the lessons in life that you’ve learned since your start as a photographer?

Noah Chace: For me personally, I find that it helps me to be centered, in the moment.  If I am late, I can miss the shot.  If I am trying too hard, then it can seem forced. I just see something in that particular moment and see a good picture. Sometimes it is, other times it’s not. I have friends who are amazing with a camera. You can really see the world through their eyes. The lesson I’ve learned is to trust yourself! Your gut instinct comes into play when finding your inner voice.

Warlock Asylum: I have great respect for the art of photography. I’ve learned from the photographers I met in the past that it is an art that requires a lot of patience. How has your outlook on life changed since learning photography?

Noah Chace: I feel that as I grow as a person, so does my appreciation for opportunity. I know that there are struggles in life, but there is also a chance for creating something new.

Noah Chace values his time with nature.

Noah Chace values his time with nature.

Warlock Asylum: Let’s talk a bit about another talent that you have developed, one that we share in common, martial arts. Where did your interest in martial arts begin?

Noah Chace: As a kid. I would watch kung fu theater on Sunday mornings.  The characters’ personal confidence was something that I wanted.  They knew right from wrong and were willing to stand up for what they believed in, very heroic type of people. That’s what I wanted to be.                  

Warlock Asylum: You are currently involved in Ninpo Taijutsu, commonly associated with the infamous Ninja. Can you give us a brief statement about Ninpo Taijutsu, just to silence a misconceptions of the modern art?

Noah Chace: Well, that is a tough question. I think there is always a risk of misunderstanding something that we haven’t personally experienced. Art, or anything for that matter, could be misconstrued.  Finding a teacher that you believe in, a style or art that speaks to you, can be a life-changing experience. I am extremely lucky in finding the teacher, guides, mentors and friends that I have. It has been a transformative experience.

Warlock Asylum: What attracted you to the study of Ninpo Taijutsu?

Noah Chace: I’ve always loved martial arts, but when I first heard of Ninpo Taijutsu I had that “ah ha” moment.  I remember feeling and thinking like; why hadn’t I known about this sooner?!! I couldn’t wait to go and see the art of the Ninja for myself.

"There is a right way to do something and a wrong way. Sometimes, we feel as if we know the best way to do things when the correct way is the best way. " - Noah Chace

“There is a right way to do something and a wrong way. Sometimes, we feel as if we know the best way to do things when the correct way is the best way. ” – Noah Chace

Warlock Asylum: Many people who study Ninpo Taijutsu and its legacy, being Ninjutsu, are often attracted to the mystical side of Japanese culture. How do you feel about such things?

Noah Chace: Being involved in martial arts has naturally lead me to want to explore the mystical side of the art and its origins.

Warlock Asylum: What have you gained from your studies in Ninpo Taijutsu and martial arts overall?

Noah Chace: Self-confidence and patience. A new skill set while interacting with the world and reacting to life’s situations.

Warlock Asylum: Recently, I heard about a new dojo in your area that you are heavily involved with. Can you give us a few details about this and your role in such?

Noah Chace: We are a training group in Rhode Island, not a dojo. After the band had parted and we went our different ways, I ended up in Rhode Island. My family is from here and I needed a kickstart to rediscover myself. A student, who I was teaching guitar to, had a brochure for someone who was teaching Ninjutsu. I decided to check it out. It was at this class that I would eventually meet my friends, who I started the training group with, Jim Mahoney, a physical therapist assistant, and John Morrissey-a carpenter painter.

We, as a group, have been traveling to Boston to The Boston Martial Arts Center for 12 years for our studies. The training group started because we are in the instructor training program. We were given permission to start instructing. So as a symbolic gesture and way for saying thank you to our teacher, Mr. Mark Davis. we formed the training group. It is a way to be part of something bigger than just ourselves.

Warlock Asylum: What advice would you give to a person who is seeking to learn martial arts as a spiritual path?

Noah Chace: It is most important to find a teacher who can help guide you along the path.

Warlock Asylum: What is one of the most profound spiritual truths that you have learned while walking the path of the martial artist?

Noah Chace: That everything in life; physically, emotionally, and spiritually, is connected.

Warlock Asylum: How has you study in martial arts affected your relationship with others? Were there any challenges that you had to overcome to be more proficient in your studies?

Noah Chace: I had to learn to get out of my own way. There is a right way to do something and a wrong way. Sometimes, we feel as if we know the best way to do things when the correct way is the best way. Whether it be your interactions with others or how you train in the arts.

Warlock Asylum: How did you learn about the Art of Ninzuwu and what is your opinion of it so far?

Noah Chace: A friend on social media reviewed a book on the subject of Ninzuwu, which sparked my interest and I look forward to learning more about it.

Warlock Asylum: What can we expect to hear from Noah Chace in the future? Any final thoughts?

Noah Chace: I would like thank you for this opportunity to express my thoughts and feelings about my experience in the study of Ninpo Taijutsu. In the future it would be nice to discuss what more we have learned.

*On behalf of the Art of Ninzuwu, we would like to extend our deepest appreciation and thanks to Noah Chace, not only for taking the time to answer a few questions, but also for his work in the community and in helping to create a better society. We wish you all the best in your endeavors. 

For those who would like to contact Noah Chance or learn more about the training group, this information can be obtained by clicking on the following links below.

Rhode Island Ninpo: http://www.rhodeislandninpo.com/

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art, Art of Ninzuwu, artists, Boston Martial Arts Center, Bujinkan, interviews, Japanese culture, Love and Light, martial arts, Ninja, Ninjutsu, Ninpo Taijutsu, Ninzuwu, Noah Chace, photography, positive thinking, spirituality